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The Supervised Life
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Few humanitarian colonists saw reserves as aboriginal property.

Most saw them as refuges, where governments could protect aboriginal people from the more exploitative and ruthless colonists.

Adults were to be trained for useful work in colonial enterprises, and to ensure they didn't become beggars, prostitutes, or a danger to themselves or others.

Public servants and missionaries could also provide moral and vocational training for young aborigines, without interference.

This paternalism was so vigorously pursued on some reserves, they became in effect, prisons.
Exile
Topic
1953-1957
activism, exile, Mabo, Edward Koiki, Mer, Mer, Murray Island, Murray Island Council, pearling industry, Torres Strait
Moore River, WA
Text
1918-1951
assimilation, Moore River, racism, reserves, settlements, supervision, Western Australia
Special Institutions
Text
1890-1963
Arnhem Land, Gove, humanitarians, immigration, Kakadu National Park, missionaries, New South Wales, Northern Territory, Queensland, rations, religion, reserves, settlements, South Australia, supervision, The Northern Territory Land Rights Act, Victoria, Yirrkala
Assimilation
Topic
 
assimilation, Australia, Australia, indigenous Australians, racism, Stolen Generation
Education & Early Work
Topic
 
education, Mabo, Edward Koiki, Mer, Murray Island, pearling industry
GovernmentAuthority
Topic
1879
assimilation, Mer, Murray Island, Murray Island Council, Murray Island Native Court, Queensland, school
The Age Of Paternalism
Topic
 
Chief Protector of Aborigines, colonisation, Federation, International law, paternalism, protection, terra nullius, White Australia Policy